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Ageing and Sexing of the Regent Honeyeater Anthochaera phrygia

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Category: Issue 3

Author(s): Geering

The Regent Honeyeater has been the subject of intensive study and conservation effort over the past decade and a half. Until now, there has been no guide to accurately age and sex Regent Honeyeaters in the field. Being able to age and sex birds potentially provides data on population structure and dynamics. In particular, it […]


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Habitat Partitioning and Interspecific Territoriality in Flame, Scarlet and Ducky Robins

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Category: Issue 3

Author(s): Tabitha Hui, Randy Rose

Flame (Petroica phoenicea), Scarlet (P. boodang) and Dusky (Melanodryas vittata) Robins occasionally occur sympatrically in Tasmania. All three species are insectivorous, inhabit forests with an open understorey, and are ecologically similar. The question then arises as to how they are able to coexist. In this study, foraging behaviour, habitat selection and interspecific territoriality in the […]


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Recruitment of the Black-chinned Honeyeater Melithreptus gularis gularis in a Fragmented Landscape in Northern New South Wales, Australia

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Category: Issue 3

Author(s): Lollback, Ford, Cairns

The Black-chinned Honeyeater Melithreptus gularis gularis is an uncommon species that may be declining in numbers in New South Wales. One possible reason for this decline may be a low fledgling rate and lack of recruitment of juveniles into the population. This study examined the production of young by this species in the fragmented woodlands […]


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Age of attaining male plumage in the Golden Whistler Pachycephala pectoralis

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Category: Issue 3

Author(s): Alan Leishman

Disney (1976; p. 74) in the ‘Bird in the Hand’ on the Golden Whistler Pachycephala pectoralis stated that: “It is not known when the males attain full plumage. However there is no evidence to show that they moult directly from first year plumage into that of the adult (see also Galbraith 1967). Galbraith (p. 293) […]


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