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Parent-Offspring attachment in the Hooded Mannikin Lonchura spectabilis of New Guinea

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Category: Issue 1

Author(s): Christopher Healey

Adults relocated nest containing young that had been moved 600 m.


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Aggression by honeyeaters and its consequences for nesting Striated Thornbills Acanthiza lineata.

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Category: Issue 1

Author(s): William Davis and Harry Recher

Anthochaera carunculata, Meliphaga chrysops and Melithreptus lunatus probably reduce reproductive success of smaller species.


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Foraging in the intertidal zone by the Australian Magpie Lark Grallina cyanoleuca, Moreton Bay, Queensland.

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Category: Issue 1

Author(s): Neil

Utilization of marine resources on an intertidal mudflat at Moreton Bay, Queensland, by the Australian Magpie Lark is reported. Magpie Larks represented 17 per cent of the individual birds observed in the study area at low tide and, for 90 per cent of observations, they foraged on seagrass beds, rather than bare mud or rocky […]


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Results of a preliminary highland bird banding study at Tari Gap, Southern Highlands, Papua New Guinea

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Category: Issue 1

Author(s): Clifford Frith and Dawn Frith

Bird banding was performed in lower montane rainforest of Tari Gap, Southern Highlands, Papua New Guinea, during eight weeks of each of three consecutive years, at seven netting sites. A total of 1 174 captures of 50 species were made, involving 895 individual birds. Of 279 recaptures, 228 were birds we banded and 51 were […]


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Notes on the breeding biology of the Regent Honeyeater.

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Category: Issue 1

Author(s): William Davis and Harry Recher

Two Regent Honeyeater Xanthomyza phrygia nests were watched for six days before both nests disappeared. Observations on nest building, copulation, incubation, feeding, vocalization and aggressive interactions with other avian species are presented. There was frequent aggression between the Regent Honeyeaters and other species of honeyeaters. It is possible that habitat fragmentation coupled with frequent and […]


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