Publications


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Showing 12 of 46 documents

Magpies similar to the White-backed Magpie in inland Western Australia.

Category: Issue 5
Author(s): Black, Ford
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Three females and one male of Gymnorhina recently collected near Wiluna, Western Australia, are described.  Two females are exactly like the White-backed Magpie G. hypoleuca leuconota.  The other specimens are possibly hybrids between the Black-backed Magpie G. tibicen longirostris and the Western Magpie G. dorsalis, hybrids between longirostris and leuconota or hybrids between all three […]

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Ageing and sexing Eastern Rosellas.

Category: Issue 4
Author(s): Wyndham, le Gay Brereton
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In field studies of birds it is often necessary to age and sex individuals.  Both sexes of Eastern Rosellas Platycercus eximius have similar plumage but that of adult males, particularly the red feathers of head and breast, are brighter than those of females and young birds.  Another difference is the two rows of spots on […]

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Asynchronous hatching, fratricide and double clutches in the Marsh Harrier.

Category: Issue 4
Author(s): Baker-Gabb
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A brood of four nestling Marsh Harriers Circus aeruginosus hatched over approximately seven days.  When the three older nestlings were banded, the fourth and youngest was one quarter of the weight of the next older nestling  The youngest nestling was killed and eaten by its siblings during a period of food shortage.  One female and […]

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Survival of birds of the understorey in lowland rainforest in Papua New Guinea.

Category: Issue 4
Author(s): Bell
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Recapture rates of birds netted at Brown River, Papua New Guinea, are analysed.  Newly-banded birds have a much lower recapture rate than birds banded one year or more.  Recapture rate of newly-banded birds is lowest in those with high breeding success and large clutches (mostly hole-nesters)and highest in those with low breeding success and small […]

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